7 Things You Probably Don’t Know About Your Eyes

May 30, 2014

It’s easy to take your eyesight for granted; it’s easy to take any sense for granted, for that matter. But our eyes, especially, are often overlooked (no pun intended) for their value to our daily lives. What might be even more surprising is how complex these essential parts of our body are. Here are some interesting facts about your eyes that you may not know. Hopefully, after reading, you gain a new found respect for your eyes and think more regularly about how important they are to your daily life, and why they are worth protecting.
1.) Newborns don’t produce tears. The screaming cry new parents quickly become accustomed to won’t include actual tears from anywhere between 4-13 weeks old.
2.) Your eyes are resilient. While a cut on your hand or a scratch on your knee may take a week to heal, your eyes can completely repair a scratch on your cornea in just about 48 hours.
3.) Your eyes use a lot of brain power. It only takes a fraction of your brain’s function to pick up a pencil from a table. However, just to see that pencil resting on the table takes anywhere between 30-65% of your brain’s power.
4.) Your eye contains 107 million cells. 7 million of those cells are called “rods,” which help you see shapes. The remaining 100 million cells are called “cones,” and they help you see color.
5.) All blue-eyed people are related, sort of. If you have blue eyes, you share a common ancestor with every other blue-eyed person on the world. Before there was the first person to have blue eyes, everyone’s eyes were brown.
6.) 20/20 vision isn’t perfect. It’s normal. In fact, the lower the second number is, the better your vision. The best vision ever recorded is 20/8. That means a person could see at 20 feet what an average person could see at 8 feet.
7.) 80% of all eye diseases or problems are curable. With early detection from your eye doctor and the right treatment, almost every problem affecting your eyesight is completely curable. However, this percentage drops every year a problem goes undetected. Consider that the next time you think about rescheduling your eye exam.

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